Canada

Telegraph Cove, B.C

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North Vancouver Island.

 

It’s with sadness that we leave TC on Sunday. Our summer is over here and it’s time to get back to reality. (we will go kicking and screaming!!)

 

However, we were truly blessed to have one last day (Friday) on the water. Fishing. Whale watching, bird watching, fishing, feeding the eagles, fishing.

 

Lynn and Chuck graciously invited us to go bottom fishing and this time Dale got his license (on-line) to give this sport a go. He did very well too. Photo’s prove it! 🙂

He caught dinner – Kelp Greenling Cod. A beautiful fish.

 

 

Chuck gave him pointers.


Last catch of the day!

 

We were out of Bausa Cove next to a small island with an eagle’s nest. Both eagles were in residence. So any small fish we caught became dinner for eagles. Chuck would whistle and toss the fish and the eagle would swoop down from the top of the trees, make a circle around us, and swoop in to grab the fish. Truly awesome seeing this.

 

This eagle was the first one down. He grabbed his fish and took it back to the island and ate it.

 

The second eagle gave us a good show.

 

 

Dale took a video of this. Check it out here.

Freaking awesome!

 

We saw so much action on the water today. Barges probably coming down from Alaska load down; barges in Blackfish Strait; cruise ships heading to Vancouver or Seattle after enjoying a trip around Alaska; and many different types of boats. The Orcas passed by us. Always a treat. A seal came to see if he could get dinner from us. And many, many birds and gulls.

 

A beautiful day with very generous friends.

 

Life is beautiful and so good. God shows himself in His creation all the time.

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A Whale of a Tail

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As I was shopping at Stubbs Whale Tour shop, I ran into Heike, owner of the Whale tour company. She is our neighbor for the summer. After small talk she asked me if we had taken their tour yet. “Not yet,” I said. “How about going on the 5 p.m. tour tomorrow?” Silly question!!!

 

Tuesday ended up being our hottest day here so far and that made for a great 3 hour trip starting at 5 p.m. for us.

 

We left the mouth to Telegraph Cove and immediately came across Orcas. Allison, our naturalist guide told us this is a family of mom, brother, 2 daughters and 2 cousins. They can tell by their dorsal fins who they are. Fife, the male has a nick in his fin from a vessel. And the mom is the boss and leader!

 

This is the Lukwa, “a place in the forest.” Our captain, was Wayne, who also lives next door to us. He has been on these waters for 60. First as a RCMP and then as a captain for Stubbs Island.

 

 

Heike’s dog, Cleo, keeps watch on the boardwalk everyday.

 

 

Dale looking for Orcas.

 

 

Only a tiny fin here but the water was really cool after the dive.

 

We followed these whales for about 1.5 hours. They are fish eating whales. About half way through the time we spent watching them, some White Belled Porpoises came along aggravating the Orca. Splashes occurred.

 

On the way to the seals, two Dall Porpoise came along side the boat and got right next to it. They can travel like 55 kph. They were going so fast. In and out under the boat. No photo because we were so amazed to actually fully see them. They zoomed off to the right lickety-split.

 

Once we got under way, we were head to Black Fish Strait. Here we saw the Stellar Seals, largest in the world and bigger than a grizzly.

 

I spotted these eagles a little to late. Actually I saw the one in the top and the other after editing the photo! I guess it is mating season.

 

 

Some scenes from the strait. Smoke from Canada came in pretty good today.

 

Look who else is fishing.

 


 

We could see the humpbacks blowing way off or “puffing” as Capt. Wayne said. We were off the north tip of Malcolm Island and got around 4 humpbacks. They weren’t very photogenic today.

 

 

When looking for humpbacks, one always looks for birds who are attacking a bait ball. The fish, herrings, is what humpbacks eat.

 

 

Allison was able to get this one!

 

 

Captain Wayne put us on the boat first so got a great spot. I actually sat up above my head most of the time. And then in the back. We would run from the front to the back and then up front. We had a great day for whale watching.

 

As we went back into Telegraph Cove, the sun was setting and gave us a great sunset.

 

For more great, great photo’s head on over to the Stubbs website.

 

Life is great! Again, God’s creation is breath taking.

 

 

Have You Heard

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about the Rubbing Beach? It is quite amazing.

On our day off last week we drove the Forester (Ebony Shadow) to Port McNeil to the ferry to go to Malcolm Island. The little village we came into is Sointula. We drove through town, down past the marina to Bere Point Beach Campground and Beautiful Bay trail.

On research of this area I ran across the Rubbing Beach where Orcas come to rub their belly and bodies on the stones close to shore. No one know why they do this. Many theories about why but no one really knows why. Now wouldn’t that be a sight to see. I knew we just had to visit here. I was so excited!

We arrived at the campground which was pretty full. We drove to the trail head, got Morgan out of the car and our lunch and cameras and took off up the trail.

Bere Beach is on the west side of Malcolm Island and on the Queen Charlotte Strait. The point on the right is Bere Point and the one on the left is Malcolm Point. A trail goes from point to point.

 

A very nice trail but covered on both sides with foliage. We came to a platform where one can watch the rubbing beach for Orcas.

 

All about the different Killer Whales.

 

The tide was out when we were there and something we didn’t even think to plan for. Alas, no Orcas showed up to give us a show. We were bummed but if we come back next year we will plan better and earlier in the season. You can see here what this is all about.

 

If you look way down the beach you will see a tarp. People who monitor the Orca were camping out there with all their equipment. It was interesting to chat with them and hear about their study. We also got to talk to a couple from Victoria who want to become RVers when their time comes. We got to share RV information with them.

Time for lunch.

Since we didn’t get to photograph Orcas, next best thing was the birds.

An eagle came to visit too.

Malcolm Point

 

Rubbing Beach at Bere Point. A sign told us not to walk on the beach because the Orca can hear our steps. We tipped toed out and sat on a log waiting and waiting.

About an hour and a half later we left and drove to the other end of the island and then headed to get in line for the ferry and head home.

A very good day!!!

Life is awesome. The work of God’s hand in creation is so amazing and beautiful – on Beautiful Bay.

 

We Took A Little Trip

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down the Kokish Main dirt road that goes to the dam that supplies energy to the electrical plant on Beaver Cove Rd. Our destination – Bonanza Lake.

As we were kicking up dust behind our Forester, around the corner and I’ hollering BEAR, BEAR. I didn’t have my camera with me so no photos. He/She was going down into the canyon so we pulled up as close as we could get to the edge. He/she stopped on a couple of logs and looked back at me. So I talked to it. 🙂 He listened for a minute and turned and proceeded on his/her way. Guess conversation wasn’t her/his thing! What he/she didn’t know is that I had just mentioned to Dale that we might see a bear. God heard!

Just like this bear we saw in Bausa Cove.

The first lake we came too is Ida Lake. There are about 5 camp sites on the beach of the lake. It was so peaceful here – about 12k off Beaver Cove Rd.

The next lake we came to – 18 more kilometers south of Ida Lake is Bonanza Lake. It is a very large lake. 9.1k long.

Machinery left behind.

We couldn’t wait to see the temp of the water since we were having the hottest day since we have been here. We were thinking our swimsuits should have come with us. So Dale waded in. Then I had to try it.

Some one has a sense of humor! A couple of small roads lead to campsites on the lake. There was one at this place. It also looked like deer hunters use these campsites beside those coming to camp and enjoy the lake.

On another day we drove to Woss for breakfast and then to Woss Lake. Another beautiful lake.

 

As

As you can see, this was a cooler day and only our hands tested the temp of the water.

We have enjoyed seeing the surrounding sights around Telegraph Cove. Northern Vancouver Island is so pretty.

Life is very good – calm and peaceful. It helps to keep God’s peace close to the heart. Amazing.

 

Lost? Us?

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Wednesday, our day off, we decided to go explore Port Alice. Port Alice is located about 73 K (about 45 miles) from Telegraph Cove. Port Alice sits on the Neroutsos Inlet. On our way up the road to Port Alice we stopped at every scenic spot.

Beaver Creek. The place to be on a hot day. Picnic tables and swimming.

 

Marble Lake. Camping (a Provincial Park), fishing and hiking.

 

Back in the 60’s Port Alice was a growing community with a pulp mill. They hail themselves as “Gateway to the Wild West Coast.” This will probably be as far west as we will get this trip. This inlet goes out to the Pacific Ocean.  Today, it is a small village with about 1000 people.

 

Visitor’s Center

After driving to the place where the pulp mill was, we turned around and came back to find a beach to have lunch.

 

It was quiet and we watched boats heading toward the end of the inlet.

 

A beacon.

 

This seal popped up and watched us for a while. I went to get my long camera lens but it was gone by the time I got back. So a fuzzy photo.

 

Just a cool photo opportunity.

After lunch we decided to take the Alice Loop (dirt logging road) back to Hwy. 30. We later learned that the log trucks were off for 2 weeks and boy, were we glad. It would have been miserable if we had to contend with them or them us!

We found Alice Lake.

Camping and swimming.

There were few road signs to lead us back to Hwy 30. There was no “Hwy 30” this way! So, with our trusty map we thought we were on the right road.

We came to:

 

They call this a centos and Devils Bath is the largest. I think we would call this a cauldron.
We had to climb up to see Devil’s Bath. There was no hiking down to it.

 

As we drove along we would see signs like this. All started with “Tourist.”

 

This is Katherine’s lake. This was, also, where we discovered we were lost. We should not be this far east. Hwy 30 was not in this direction. We started to turn around and Dale saw in the rear view mirror that a black bear was behind us. I tried to get a quick photo but he was too far away. When he saw us he turned and ran away. Our first bear sighting!!!

On the way back to finding which road we were to be on, one of God’s human angels came by. He was a local and had a crew building bridges for the log trucks. We had a nice chat with him and he explained how to get back to the highway. We saw our mistake – turning right when we should have turned left.

Around a curve and we saw this. He had just pooped in the road and went off in the bushes. When he saw us he ran across the road and silly me did not have my long lens on. So we have finally seen 2 black bears.

Back on the highway and off to Port McNeil for groceries and back home by 5.

Getting lost is always fun and you see stuff you wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

Ferns every where and  Fire weed was in abundance.

Life is good. God does have angels watching over us – spiritual or human!

Let’s Take a Tour of TC

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Telegraph Cove, located north of Campbell River B.C. on Vancouver Island, is a small cove that hosts a marina, condo’s, restaurants, whale watching tours, bear tours, a general store, several coffee shops, kayak tours and just a nice place to sit and relax. TC sits on Johnstone Strait.

 

TC got its name when a superintendent of Telegraphs was hunting for a place for a line from Campbell River in 1912 and came upon this fishing village. In the 1920’s, Alfred Wastell built a lumber mill and a salmon saltery in the cove. During WWII, TC became a relay station for the Air Force. Many of the buildings seen today were built during that time. For decades, Telegraph Cove remained a sleepy hamlet of board walks and wooden buildings built on pilings on the coast. Boat was the only means of transportation. Automobile access arrived only in 1956 and with it, the potential for tourism. By the 1970’s, the lumber mill and salmon saltery were ending their historic runs. Now it was time for vacationers, sport fishermen and whale watchers. Stubbs Island Whale Watching, the very first outfit of its kind in BC, launched in 1980.

 

Let’s go on a photo tour of Telegraph Cove. You can click any photo to make it bigger!

 

Entrance to TC
Our office. Let me explain some local tidbits. The marina and this building belong to our boss. The condo’s and boardwalk belong to someone else. That is why there are two offices. 

 

This is the Seahorse Cafe. Marco and Lana have been in this spot for 14 years. Good food!
The Seahorse Gallery offers finer tourist gems. Shirts, scarves, handcrafted jewelry and cool drinking containers. Many have the First Nations emblems on them.

 

Entrance to the boardwalk. There are a lot of old machinery parts left from the various businesses over the years laying around.

This tree is just inside the entrance to the boardwalk.

 

 

 

This is the General Store. No nuts and bolts but most everything else. Fishermen and tourist stuff and some food stuff.

 

Outside seating at one of the coffee shops next to the TC office.

 

This is the boardwalk post office mailbox where we mail letters and postcards.

 

The Board Walk

 

The brown building on the right houses all the employees. It is the Bunk House and this is where the Air Force guys stayed.
An old Dodge truck gets its photo taken a lot!
Flowers are everywhere making TC look beautiful.

The Killer Whale Restaurant. Serves up some great food. Very nice inside seating.
Killer Whale Restaurant also has marina side seating.
In July, on Wednesdays – Saturday there is a Salmon Bake on the boardwalk at The Killer Whale Restaurant. The meal consists of the most moist and delicious salmon. Sides are 3 salads and corn on the cob. A mere $27 ca.

 

Rooms and cabins are for rent. They line the boardwalk.
Right next door to the restaurant is the pub. Haven’t been in here yet. Spirits served.
The story behind this oar….a cougar attacked a little dog. A nearby couple saw this oar in the tree, took it to beat on the cougar’s head and they broke it. Poor puppy lived but was blinded by the cougars jaw.
Nice gesture to keep the boardwalk free of pet poop.

Decorations galore.

One of many bird houses.
The other coffee shop.
Stubbs Whale Watching tours are very popular. Buses of people come in weekly. And yes, they see lots of whales, seals, otters, and eagles.
All aboard for the whale tours. There are 2 boats. (click to see) One large one, Lukwa, holds 46 people. The newer boat, Kultua is smaller.
Whales are a big deal here because this is their home. So they have to be a museum to tell all.

Across the mouth to the marina and from these photo’s is the boardwalk on the other side of the marina. Dale and I hike over the mountain and down to this boardwalk. Beautiful views of Johnstone Strait here.

The Marina

Across from our office is the Dockside 29 condo’s privately owned. They sit right on the edge of the marina.

See the yacht! Been here for a month. Hasn’t moved.
North Island Kayak tours are very popular.

Finally —-

Our domain as hosts.

I hope you have enjoyed this little tour. We have come to love this beautiful gem nestled amongst all the islands dotting the northern part of Vancouver Island.

A treat! 

Life is amazing and so good. God’s creation astounds us with its creativity and beauty.

It’s Exciting!!! to be Making Plans for Summer

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As I mentioned in an earlier post that we volunteered to be camp hosts in Telegraph Cove this summer.

This was a difficult decision for us as we usually have been in “paid” positions. This job means all expenses to get there are on us without a “salary.” We decided the adventure and exploring a part of the island we haven’t been to is compensation enough.

Telegraph Cove, BC. It’s a beautiful spot on the Johnstone Straight and near Port Hardy. The RV park is 48 spaces and very popular with international campers. Check it out here.

We have been as far as Campbell River back in 2004 when we went on a week-long kayak camping trip out of Cortes Island and kayaked through Desolation Sound. 

We are so excited to have this opportunity to explore this part of Vancouver Island. More exciting is the fact that we are making ferry reservations TODAY! And they are having a sale to boot on ferry fees!! A Win – Win!

We will sail out of Vancouver, BC to Nanaimo. We are looking for a space to park for the night once we arrive. Canadian Tire seems to let RVers park in their parking lot. An email has been sent to them to make sure. Wal-Mart and Cabelas do not allow overnight parking.

Plans are starting to jell. It’s going to be a great summer.

Life is so good! God’s love is amazing and real.